Water Saving Tips

Swimming Pool Tips

Pool Covers:

  • Using a pool cover regularly reduces evaporation by 90 to 95%.
  • Without a cover, an average pool (18 feet x 36 feet) loses about 1 inch of water per week in the peak of summer. This can add up to an annual water loss of 7,000 gallons of water.
  • One of the most important benefits of using a pool cover can be enhanced safety.

Indication of a pool leak:

  • Algae or other water quality problems can occur when a leak prevents the water level and chemistry from staying constant.
  • Loose tiles or cracks in the pool deck.
  • Cracks and gaps in the bond beam or water-saturated soils in the area around the pool, pumps or plumbing.

Pool Leak Test:

Test #1

  • Algae or other water quality problems can occur when a leak prevents the water level and chemistry from staying constant.
  • Loose tiles or cracks in the pool deck.
  • Cracks and gaps in the bond beam or water-saturated soils in the area around the pool, pumps or plumbing.

Pool Leak Test:

Test #1

  • Use a grease pencil to mark the water level of the pool at the skimmer.
  • Check the mark 24 hours later.
  • Your pool should loose no more than ¼ inch per day. Otherwise, a leak is indicated.

Test #2

  • Place a 5 gallon bucket filled with pool water on a pool step (the level in the bucket should be even with the pool level).
  • Mark the level of the water in the bucket and on the side of the pool.
  • After 24 hours if there is a greater drop in the pool level than in the bucket, a leak in the pool is indicated.

Determining the Location of the Leak:

  • If the water level settles at the skimmer, the leak is probably in the filtration system
  • If the water level settles at the light, the leak is probably there.
  • If the water drops below the light, then there may be a leak in the drain at the bottom of the pool.

Filters:

Due to their ease in maintenance cartridge filters are a good alternative to diatomaceous earth or sand filters that typically use up to 500 gallons of water per backwash.

Indoor Water Saving Tips
Outdoor Water Saving Tips
Seasonal Water Saving Tips

Self-Certified Conservation Standard

Click here to view the District’s self-certified water conservation standard data and supply analysis


Due to improved hydrologic conditions in Northern California and the State Water Resources Control Board (SWRCB) easing of emergency conservation standards, Carmichael Water District (District) will be moving to Normal Water Supply Conditions under the Water Shortage Contingency Plan.  As the District shifts its focus from emergency water conservation to water efficiency, customers should be aware of the following requirements:

Restrictions

  • Unnecessary and wasteful uses of water are prohibited.
  • No water runoff from property allowed.
  • All water plumbing, fixtures, and heating/cooling devices must not be allowed to leak or discharge. All known leaks must be repaired within seven (7) days or less depending on the severity of the leak.
  • Free flowing hoses are prohibited for any use. All hoses must have an automatic shut-off control nozzle capable of completely shutting off the flow of water.
  • The application of potable water to driveways and sidewalks, except as necessary for health or sanitary purposes, is prohibited.
  • Car washing must use bucket and hose with automatic shut-off control nozzle.
  • All pools, spas, decorative or ornamental fountains, ponds and water features must be equipped with a recirculation pump and maintained leak free. Internal and external water leaks must be repaired within seven (7) days or less depending on the severity of the leak.
  • All landscapes shall be watered during cooler morning or evening hours to reduce evaporation and minimize landscape runoff.  No watering allowed between the hours of 10 a.m. and 7 p.m.
  • No irrigating turf or ornamental landscapes during and 48 hours following measurable precipitation.
  • No serving of drinking water other than upon request in food and beverage establishments.

Recommendation

  • Pool covers should be used to minimize evaporation.
  • During summer, outdoor watering three days a week is usually sufficient for typical landscape.
  • Use high efficiency plumbing fixtures and wash only full loads of laundry and dishes.

IMPORTANT NOTICE

It is important for you to be aware that the SWRCB sets water use reduction mandates and water right curtailment orders that the District is required to comply with.  The SWRCB has stated that they remain ready to return to stronger conservation mandates if necessary. The District will need to continue to monitor the actions of the SWRCB and comply with requirements moving forward. This could mean that the District would be required to reinstate a higher water shortage stage with addition water use restrictions.  We are all in this together and appreciate the past efforts and continued water use efficiency now and in the future.  The District’s website, www.carmichaelwd.org, is the best place for up-to-date information on water shortage, drought stage conditions, recommended watering schedules, and water efficiency programs.  In addition you may call our office at (916) 483-2452.

Starting June 1, 2016, a recommended three day a week watering schedule will be in effect: 

Click icon to view water schedule

DROUGHT INFORMATION

Parks Water Management

On July 16, 2015 the Carmichael Recreation and Park District Advisory Board of Directors approved a comprehensive water management plan.

Follow this link to view the presentation

Free Water Efficiency Surveys

Is your home or business water wise?  Find out by scheduling a Water Efficiency Survey with Carmichael Water District.

Our trained water conservation specialists will come to your home or business to check for leaks, offer free water saving devices, and recommend ways to help you save.

Follow this link to learn more

Landscape Tips

Trees and landscapes can become extremely stressed due to record heat and severe drought. Trees are a long-term investment that benefit us in many ways, including shading our homes and reducing energy costs, providing beauty, and more. You should be aware that your tree needs care during the drought to stay alive.

Follow this link for Landscape Survival Tips

Follow this link for tips on how to help your trees survive the drought